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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V392

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Factors affecting the detectability and eastern distribution of grizzly bears in Alberta, Canada Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
monitoring
range edge
hair trap
Grizzly bear
distribution
DNA
occupancy
Ursus arctos
detectability
Alberta
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rovang, Sarah B
Supervisor and department
Nielsen, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Stenhouse, Gordon (External)
Boyce, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Nielsen, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Foote, Lee (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Conservation Biology
Date accepted
2013-09-17T15:49:07Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Effective and adaptive conservation of a species requires knowledge of trend in abundance and distribution. Monitoring species that are highly mobile, cryptic, and occurring at low densities is especially challenging. This research investigates the local factors affecting the detectability of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in west-central Alberta, as well as regional factors affecting their eastern distribution in the province. When surveyed using a permanent DNA hair trap design, grizzly bear detection is maximized when sites are placed in areas with abundant buffaloberry and clover cover and near pipelines, wellsites, cutblocks, and streams. To the east, grizzly bear range is limited by agricultural zones, human settlements, and the loss of secure wild land habitat. Such information can help guide the placement of monitoring sites in core and peripheral habitats, which may help lower the cost of long-term monitoring programs of grizzly bear populations and range edge.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V392
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File author: Alberta Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan
Page count: 163
File language: en-CA
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