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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34K67

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The Effect of Skin and Soft Tissue on Spinal Frequency Response Measurements Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
non-invasive measurement
frequency response
soft tissue
structural damage detection
spine
skin
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Decker, Colleen
Supervisor and department
Kawchuk, Greg (Physical Therapy)
Examining committee member and department
Carey, Jason (Mechanical Engineering)
Faulkner, M. Gary (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-26T18:00:15Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Introduction: This study sought to investigate the effects of soft tissue on measurements of a spinal vibration response using skin-mounted accelerometers and a non-invasive contact tip. Methods: Vibration was applied to the spine of porcine and human cadavers. Measurements of the spinal vibration response were taken from needle, skin, and bone-mounted accelerometers. Several skin-mounted accelerometer placements dorsal to a spinous process were tested, and 6 different non-invasive contact tip shapes were used to explore sources of variance in the signals. Results: Vibration measured from skin-mounted accelerometers had altered signal patterns compared to bone-mounted accelerometers. The measured FRF was found to be sensitive to accelerometer positioning. No significant difference in skin-bone correlation was attributed to contact tip shape or vertebral level. Conclusion: The use of a non-invasive contact tip excites vibration in the soft tissues which overlay the spine, in addition to the vertebral column. This vibration interferes with skin sensor measurements of vertebral vibration response, with the effect diminishing as distance from the contact tip increases. Small changes in contact tip shape do not affect the correlation between skin and bone signals.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34K67
Rights
License granted by Colleen Decker (colleen.decker@gmail.com) on 2010-08-20T22:57:04Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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