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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V98056W

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Microstructured flexible sensors for wearable technologies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Microstructured device
wearable applications
flexible sensors
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Fan, Shicheng
Supervisor and department
Dr. Xihua Wang (Electrical& Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Manisha Gupta (Electrical& Computer Engineering)
Dr. Sandipan Pramanik (Electrical& Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization
Solid State Electronics
Date accepted
2017-08-29T09:36:05Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
As common electronics in our daily life, various sensors have been frequently used in a diversity of applications like pressure sensors for weight scales and temperature sensors for thermometers. However, most traditional sensors are built on rigid substrates, and this restricts the usage of these sensors for many areas requiring flexible devices, such as invasive healthcare monitoring. Thus, there’s a need for developing flexible sensors on flexible and stretchable substrates, especially in emerging applications in internet-of-things. In this thesis, we proposed a new concept, digital microelectromechanical (MEM) sensors based on the insulating-to-conducting transition of devices through mechanical switching, for pressure and strain detection. By adding eco-friendly nanomaterials - cellulose nanocrystals, we greatly improved the response time of our MEM sensors. Furthermore, we optimized our fabrication process to integrate multiple sensors into one device employing polymer microelectromechanical systems. Many practical applications have been demonstrated using our sensors, from hand gesture detection to heart rate monitoring. We also showed that integrated flexible sensors have the potential to control robotic arms and gripping forces in handing physical objects.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V98056W
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication
L. Meng, S. Fan, S. Milad Mahpeykar and X. Wang, nanoscale, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2013.

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