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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31N7XV8M

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Beyond the Role of Drum and Song in Schools: A Storied Approach Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Indigenous
Education
Drum
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
King, Anna Leah
Supervisor and department
Dr. Florence Glanfield Department of Secondary Education
Dr. Vera Caine Faculty of Nursing
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Stan Wilson Department of Educational Policy Studies
Dr. Florence Glanfield Department of Secondary Education
Dr. Jose DeCosta Department of Educational Policy Studies
Dr. Paula Sherman Faculty of Indigenous Studies
Dr. Vera Caine Faculty of Nursing
Department
Department of Educational Policy Studies
Specialization
Indigenous Peoples Education
Date accepted
2016-03-30T14:36:53Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
My research reflects on the use of drum and song in schools and reveals its significance from an Anishnaabe kwe perspective. A storied approach is used relative to Anishnaabe ways of being and knowing as ‘teachers’ in two forms: debaajimowin (narratives) and antasokannan (tradition or sacred). Stories are a functioning part of both the framework and methodology to present a new and evolving story that is relevant to formal schooling. In addition to inquiring into Anishnaabe stories, Elders teachings, and archival records, autobiographical experiences shaped this inquiry. The analysis was guided by Anishnaabe perspectives, as well as several key questions asked by Justice Sinclair (2014), questions that link identity and culture. Key recommendations in relation to integrating song and drum in relation to formal schooling point to the necessity to be grounded in community and cultural ways of being and knowing.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31N7XV8M
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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