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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R36H4CW2K

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Atheist Identity and Ideology in Eighteenth-Century France Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
atheism
atheists
France
Enlightenment
eighteenth century
identity
ideology
gender
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Apps, Lara M.
Supervisor and department
Gow, Andrew C. (History and Classics)
Caradonna, Jeremy (History and Classics)
Examining committee member and department
Smith, Robert W. (History and Classics)
Samson, Jane (History and Classics)
Beaman, Lori G. (Classics and Religious Studies, University of Ottawa)
Department
Department of History and Classics
Specialization
History
Date accepted
2016-05-04T14:10:30Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This dissertation examines atheist identity and ideology in eighteenth-century France up to 1776 through an analysis of numerous atheist texts, including several little-known clandestine works and the more familiar books of Jean Meslier, Julien Offray de La Mettrie and the Baron d’Holbach. It departs from most previous historiography on pre-modern atheism by fusing intellectual- and cultural-historical approaches; most importantly, it incorporates gender analysis in the interpretation of atheist texts. This research demonstrates the importance of the eighteenth century to our understanding of the continuities and ruptures in the development of atheism. For eighteenth-century atheists, writing and sharing their views was a way of resisting repression, practicing atheism within a hostile environment, and changing the social imaginary by intervening in a discourse that dehumanized them. Further, the atheist texts express a sense of identity by defining atheists as different from other members of society in several specific ways, including intellectual and moral superiority. This identity re-humanized atheists but also excluded women and the common people, on the grounds that they were not capable of understanding virtuous atheism. Atheists thus claimed for themselves the positions of wise fathers and leaders. Finally, some atheist writers presented ideological visions of ideal societies, based on the core concepts of the materiality of the world, the necessity of organizing societies rationally in accordance with nature’s laws, and the subordination of individuality to the common good and social or moral order. The atheist ideology was essentially optimistic concerning human progress, but its elitist and patriarchal aspects challenge the view of atheism as necessarily democratic and progressive.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R36H4CW2K
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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