ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of The influence of a community-based HIV/AIDS treatment project on HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices in rural UgandaDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3JW7F

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

The influence of a community-based HIV/AIDS treatment project on HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices in rural Uganda Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
HIV/AIDS
Community-based
ART
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Aplin, Laura C. R.
Supervisor and department
Saunders, L. Duncan (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Saunders, L. Duncan (Public Health Sciences)
Jhangri, Gian (Public Health Sciences)
Kipp, Walter (Public Health Sciences)
Mill, Judy (Nursing)
Department
School Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Global Health
Date accepted
2012-05-11T09:44:50Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
A community-based antiretroviral therapy (CBART) program has been operating in Rwimi sub-county in Western Uganda since 2005. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether this CBART program led to increased knowledge and awareness of HIV and ART, improved attitudes towards people living with the disease, and improved HIV prevention practices in the broader community. Surveys and focus group discussions (FGDs) were carried out from September to December 2009 with 405 residents of Rwimi sub-county and 193 adult residents of a nearby sub-county without a CBART program. Logistic regression was used to describe associations with ART knowledge, HIV/AIDS-related attitudes, HIV testing, and condom use. Residents of Kisomoro had more positive results in all areas. However, in the multivariable models this was only statistically significant for HIV/AIDS-related attitudes. Findings from the FGDs confirmed that, overall, the CBART program did not appear to significantly increase HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and prevention practices.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3JW7F
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-25T00:44:13.463+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1229823
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:49:23-06:00
Filename: Aplin_Laura_Fall 2012.pdf
Original checksum: 03869765971d321cc6cb71c82fd11ec0
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Microsoft Word - Aplin_Laura_Fall 2012.doc
File author: Laura Aplin
Page count: 112
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date