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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3N29PK0R

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Group Cohesion in Substance Abuse Treatment Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Substance Abuse
Group Cohesion
Group Therapy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Maire, Brenda
Supervisor and department
Greenshaw, Andrew
Examining committee member and department
Baker, Glen (Psychiatry)
Whelton, William (Education)
Fujiwara, Esther (Psychiatry)
Greenshaw, Andrew (Psychiatry)
Pazderka, Hannah (Psychiatry)
Department
Department of Psychiatry
Specialization

Date accepted
2016-12-13T14:39:40Z
Graduation date
2017-06:Spring 2017
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to contribute to research on group cohesion among patients attending treatment for their substance abuse. Participants (N = 102) were recruited from a residential substance abuse treatment facility and assessed for group cohesion using the Group Climate Questionnaire in relation to symptom improvement. Patients’ mental health concerns and severity of distress significantly improved pre- to post-treatment. However, group cohesion did not predict treatment outcome. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed a positive relationship between linear change in Conflict over time and pre- to post-treatment change in severity of distress. Participants with greater linear change in-group conflict had greater change in severity of distress. A second analysis using regression was used to determine if treatment change could be predicted by group cohesion, client and treatment factors. The result was a 5-factor model that accounted for 56% of variance in patients’ residual change with regard to severity of distress. The 5-factor model did not significantly predict treatment change in mental health concerns.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3N29PK0R
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 759338
Last modified: 2017:06:13 12:08:58-06:00
Filename: Maire_Brenda_N_ 201610_MSc.pdf
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File title: Substance Abuse Treatment
File language: EN-CA
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