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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X921X0M

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Genetic structure, virulence and fungicide sensitivity of Pyrenophora teres f. teres and P. teres f. maculata populations from western Canada Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Net blotch
Virulence
Barley
Genetic structure
Fungicide sensitivity
Resistance
Pyrenophora teres
western Canada
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Akhavan, Alireza
Supervisor and department
Strelkov, Stephen Ernest (AFNS)
Turkington, Thomas Kelly (Lacombe Research and Development Centre, AAFC)
Examining committee member and department
Basu, Urmila (AFNS)
Strelkov, Stephen Ernest (AFNS)
McCallum, Brent (Morden Research and Development Centre, AAFC)
Spaner, Dean (AFNS)
Turkington, Thomas Kelly (Lacombe Research and Development Centre, AAFC)
Friesen, Timothy L. (Cereal Crops Research, USDA)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Plant Science
Date accepted
2017-01-05T15:50:03Z
Graduation date
2017-06:Spring 2017
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The fungi Pyrenophora teres f. teres (Ptt) and P. teres f. maculata (Ptm) cause net form net blotch (NFNB) and spot form net blotch (SFNB) of barley, respectively. The genetic structure of a collection of 128 Ptt and 92 Ptm isolates, representing fungal populations from western Canada, was studied by simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker analysis. Thirteen SSR loci were examined and found to be polymorphic within both Ptt and Ptm populations. Significant genetic differentiation (PhiPT = 0.230, P = 0.001) was found among all populations. Isolates clustered in two distinct groups conforming to Ptt or Ptm, with no intermediate cluster. PCR analysis with mating type (MAT)-specific primers indicated that the MAT1 and MAT2 idiomorphs of Ptt and Ptm could be identified within the same field and on the same plants. There was no significant departure from the expected 1:1 MAT1/MAT2 ratio for either form. The virulence of a subset of 39 Ptt and 27 Ptm isolates was tested by inoculating these isolates onto barley differential hosts. Cluster analysis revealed 16 and 13 pathotype groups, respectively, among the Ptt and Ptm isolates. The barley differentials CI 5791 and CI 9820 were resistant to all Ptt isolates except one, while the differential CI 9214 was resistant to all Ptm except two. These differentials may prove useful in resistance breeding efforts, especially since some isolates were found to be highly virulent on barley cultivars previously classified as having good or very good NFNB and/or SFNB resistance. The propiconazole and pyraclostrobin sensitivity of a subset of 39 Ptt and 27 Ptm isolates also was evaluated against discriminatory doses of 5 mg propiconazole L-1 and 0.15 mg pyraclostrobin L-1 in microtiter plate bioassays. Two Ptt isolates appeared to be insensitive to propiconazole (growth inhibition < 30%), while one Ptm isolate was insensitive to pyraclostrobin and also exhibited decreased sensitivity to propiconazole. Populations of Ptt and Ptm from western Canada appear to be genetically and pathogenically diverse, and farmers should avoid planting the same resistant barley cultivars in short rotation, as well as the excessive application of the same fungicidal modes of action.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X921X0M
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication
Akhavan A, Turkington TK, Kebede B, Tekauz A, Kutcher HR, Kirkham C, Xi K, Kumar K, Tucker JR, Strelkov SE. 2015. Prevalence of mating type idiomorphs in Pyrenophora teres f. teres and P. teres f. maculata populations from the Canadian prairies. Can. J Plant Pathol. 37:52-60.Akhavan A, Turkington TK, Kebede B, Xi K, Kumar K, Tekauz A, Kutcher HR, Tucker JR, Strelkov SE. 2016. Genetic structure of Pyrenophora teres f. teres and P. teres f. maculata populations from western Canada. Eur J Plant Pathol. 146:325–335.Akhavan A, Turkington TK, Askarian H, Tekauz A, Xi K, Tucker JR, Kutcher HR, Strelkov SE. 2016. Virulence of Pyrenophora teres populations in western Canada. Can J Plant Pathol. 38:183-196.Akhavan A, Strelkov SE, Kher SW, Askarian H, Tucker JR, Legge WG, Tekauz A, Turkington TK. 2017. Resistance to Pyrenophora teres f. teres and P. teres f. maculata in Canadian barley genotypes. Crop Sci. doi: 10.2135/cropsci2016.05.0385.

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