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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3R78634W

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Surveying Intimate Partner Violence Myths Among Post-secondary Students Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
intimate partner violence
DVMA
IPV
intimate partner violence myths
domestic violence
domestic violence myths
domestic violence myth acceptance
victimization
gender
intimate partner violence myth acceptance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Keyes, Nadia
Supervisor and department
Truscott, Derek (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Pei, Jacqueline (Educational Psychology)
Truscott, Derek (Educational Psychology)
Wallace, Kevin (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Counselling Psychology
Date accepted
2017-05-11T13:11:38Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to extend the rape myth literature to intimate partner violence (IPV) myths by evaluating the prevalence of IPV myth acceptance and clarifying whether gender and prior IPV victimization are associated with IPV myth acceptance. To this end, three research questions were explored: 1) What is the prevalence of IPV myth acceptance amongst a student population? 2) Does gender correlate with IPV myth acceptance? 3) Do victims and non-victims of IPV accept IPV myths differently? University of Alberta students were contacted via posters and classroom presentations to participate in a 15-minute online survey containing a demographic survey, the Marlow-Crown Social Desirability Scale (MC-C; Reynolds, 1982), the Domestic Violence Myth Acceptance scale (DVMAS; Peters, 2003), and three subscales from the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2; Straus et al., 1996). Depending upon the criteria used to define acceptance, between 65% (neither agreeing nor disagreeing that “domestic violence rarely happens in my neighbourhood”) and 11% (strongly agreeing that “if a woman doesn’t like it she can leave”) of participants accepted at least one IPV myth. Consistent with expectations, men accepted IPV myths to a greater extent than women, and victims of IPV did not differ from non-victims in their acceptance of IPV myths.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3R78634W
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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Last modified: 2017:11:08 17:20:29-07:00
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