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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35059

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Theses and Dissertations

Engendering food meaning and identity for Southern Sudanese refugee women in Brooks, Alberta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
cosmopolitanism
food
identity
Southern Sudanese
gender
refugees
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Oleschuk, Merin
Supervisor and department
Vallianatos, Helen (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Kaler, Amy (Sociology)
DeBernardi, Jean (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-25T18:28:27Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis explores the food practices of Southern Sudanese refugee women in Brooks, Alberta, illustrating how foodways (Long, 2004) impact and reflect women’s conceptions of themselves as gendered, multinational citizens. These women’s relationship to food is an ambivalent one; simultaneous food maintenance and re-creation represents women’s understandings about themselves within intersecting cosmopolitan and local identities. Women use food to connect them to their Southern Sudanese, Canadian, and cosmopolitan identities, and therefore embody ‘actually existing’ cosmopolitanism (Robbins, 1998). Women demonstrate agency in their foodways as they utilize cosmopolitan praxis to gain status, address quotidian challenges, and question established gender norms. Ultimately, transnational foodways represent freedom for Southern Sudanese women as they indicate their willingness and ability to move through the boundaries of identification as needed. The result of this movement is not without tension and as women appropriate transnational foodways they negotiate the power encompassed in ethnic and national gendered identities.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35059
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2015:10:12 13:18:40-06:00
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File author: Merin Oleschuk
Page count: 210
File language: en-CA
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