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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3P844653

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Young People and Mediators Appraising the Design of Multimedia Information Texts Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
credibility
multimedia
aesthetics
information design
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sivak, Allison J.
Supervisor and department
Mackey, Margaret (Library and Information Studies)
McClay, Jill (Elementary Education)
Examining committee member and department
Wallin, Jason (Secondary Education)
Branch-Mueller, Jennifer (Elementary Education)
Samek, Toni (Library and Information Studies)
Department
Department of Elementary Education
School of Library and Information Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2016-03-31T11:27:47Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This study investigates the ways in which the aesthetics of design in multimedia informational materials influence young people’s perceptions of information credibility. The researcher conducted in-person interviews with 12 young people and three designers, regarding a selection of five materials on the topic of the environment. Interviewees were asked about their interpretations of the materials’ design elements, and the extent to which interviewees related design to the credibility of the information presented by those materials. Before the interviews, the researcher conducted a think-aloud protocol to note her own responses to the set of five materials, and a discourse analysis of reviews of the materials, from professional librarian literature, was also conducted. Responses given by the interviewees were analyzed through the framework of Rabinowitz’s “rules of reading.” Findings highlight the complexity involved in the seeing and reading processes, as well as the individuality of responses, based on an interviewee’s own literacy practices and preferences, even as that individual learns interpretive conventions held by communities of readers and viewers. This research disputes long-held assumptions about the “universality” of communication design choices. The findings suggest that mediators of multimedia texts (such as librarians) encourage young readers / viewers to pay attention to their own affective responses when engaging with a text as a part of their literacy practices. Librarians should also ensure different formats and media design of materials are considered in the building of library collections, in order to offer readers / viewers diverse works with which they can read “for contrast, comparison, and exposure of the act of making meaning” (Drucker 62).
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3P844653
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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