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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3N58CZ32

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A place for habitual communal entrepreneurship: Toward a theory of how community-based enterprises can encourage and sustain habitual communal entrepreneurship Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
community-based enterprise
community
place
habitual entrepreneurship
social practices
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nordstrom, Onnolee A
Supervisor and department
Jennings, Jennifer (Faculty of Business)
Reay, Patricia (Faculty of Business)
Examining committee member and department
Peredo, Ana Maria (Sustainable entrepreneurship and international business, University of Victoria)
Steier, Lloyd (Faculty of Business)
Lounsbury, Mike (Faculty of Business)
Department
Faculty of Business
Specialization
Strategic Management and Organization
Date accepted
2016-12-22T11:55:12Z
Graduation date
2017-06:Spring 2017
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
In this research I employ ethnographic procedures and a grounded theory analytic approach to address questions regarding how established community-based enterprises (CBEs) encourage and sustain repeated acts of entrepreneurship. Through my attention to the key characteristics of place, I develop a model that improves our understanding of community-based enterprising and habitual entrepreneurship. My findings highlight the important role of place by showing how within an isolated, communal, small, and secure place eight community practices become socially embedded everyday actions that promote and sustain habitual communal entrepreneurship. I identify and describe four of these everyday social practices—tinkering, considering the needs of others, provoking, and normalizing failure—as critical to sustaining habitual communal entrepreneurship. I also identify and describe four of these everyday social practices—maintaining boundaries, encouraging social collisions, providing familial well-being, fulfilling a higher purpose—as place-sustaining practices that, while designed to support and maintain the community, also acted to reinforce the entrepreneurship-sustaining practices that encouraged and sustained habitual communal enterprising. In doing this, my findings challenge the view that places are largely irrelevant in today’s globalized connected world, instead empirically supporting the contention that place and its multidimensional components have an important influence on behaviour.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3N58CZ32
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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