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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3WS8HV3R

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Habitat use by the wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus (LeConte, 1825)) within pothole wetlands modified by beaver (Castor canadensis Kuhl, 1820) in east-central Alberta Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
Habitat use
Amphibian
Ecosystem engineering
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Anderson, Nils L.
Supervisor and department
Paszkowski, Cynthia (Biological Sciences)
Hood, Glynnis (Augustana Faculty)
Examining committee member and department
Proctor, Heather (Biological Sciences)
Bayne, Erin (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2013-07-24T08:55:29Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Studies of amphibian habitat use often focus on using landscape characteristics to predict occupancy at broad spatial scales, but few have investigated how amphibians use specific habitat features within a wetland, such as the distinct habitat features created by beavers. In pothole wetlands of east-central Alberta, I examined the use of beaver lodges and beaver foraging canals by wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus (LeConte, 1825)) during breeding, larval development and post-metamorphic dispersal. Early thaw near occupied beaver lodges did not lead to earlier calling in wood frogs, and neither lodges nor canals were attractive oviposition sites compared to unmodified pond margins. Larval wood frogs primarily used unmodified pond margins and beaver canals, and avoided the central open water zone of the pond. Post-metamorphic wood frogs followed canals while dispersing from their natal pond. Thus, beaver canals linked aquatic and terrestrial environments: a potentially important consideration in the design of constructed wetlands.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3WS8HV3R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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