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Development of an Experimental Apparatus for Studying the Effects of Acoustic Excitation on Viscosity Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Oil Sand
Excitation
Bitumen
Viscosity
Acoustic
Pressure
Bentonite
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Evans, Marc David
Supervisor and department
Nobes, David (Mechanical Engineering)
Lipsett, Michael (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Lipsett, Michael (Mechanical Engineering)
Kuru, Ergun (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Olfert, Jason (Mechanical Engineering)
Nobes, David (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization
Engineering Management
Date accepted
2012-08-08T13:54:40Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
An experimental apparatus was developed capable of measuring changes in fluid viscosity occurring due to acoustic stimulation. Controls allowed measurements at simulated oil sand reservoir pressures and temperatures with near real-time data visualization. Calibration was performed using NIST-traceable viscosity standards. Parametric acoustic excitation experiments were performed on bitumen, bentonite slurries, and viscosity standards at 500psi static pressure, 20-80°C temperatures, ±100-400psi acoustic pressures, and 5-20Hz sinusoidal frequencies. The viscosities of bitumen and NIST standards were unaffected by excitation at any of these amplitudes/frequencies. Bentonite showed viscosity reductions as large as 75% with a positive correlation observed between acoustic excitation amplitude and magnitude of reduction. Frequency variation had minimal to no effect on viscosity. Bentonite viscosities quickly approached minimum values after the start of stimulation but took hours to plateau. Once stimulation ceased, slurries recovered to their pre-stimulated viscosities. Viscometer damage that occurred during testing prevented collection of results for oil sand.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3JS5N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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