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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31C1TV9T

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Food (In)Security: Food Policy and Vulnerability in Kugaaruk, Nunavut Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
health
feminist theory
Inuit
food insecurity
vulnerability
Nutrition North
Kugaaruk
policy
food security
food policy
Pelly Bay
settler colonialism
community economies
Indigenous Studies
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Daborn, Merissa L
Supervisor and department
Robertson, Sean (Native Studies)
Examining committee member and department
TallBear, Kim (Native Studies)
Todd, Zoe (Anthropology, Carleton)
Department
Faculty of Native Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2017-09-22T13:17:08Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
My research uses a framework of vulnerability and community economy to understand how Inuit practices of sharing need to be reflected in federal food policies for Inuit to be able to meet their food needs. I specifically draw on the work of feminist theorists such as Judith Butler, and Erin Cunniff Gilson, to consider how vulnerability that is expressed through acts of dependency and relationality can serve to meet peoples’ food needs. I also take up the work of feminist economic geographers J. K. Gibson-Graham to understand how community economic capacities in Kugaaruk are informed by and thrive through the practice of vulnerability. I interviewed a range of community members in Kugaaruk including elders, hunters, people who run community food programs, and people who use community food programs – all of whom are invested in mitigating high rates of food insecurity in the community. Food sharing, which is a long standing practice and an Inuit law, is an important aspect of successful food programming in the community and something that community members want to see continue, despite realities, such as high costs and ineffective policies, that make it a very hard practice to maintain. I argue that if the government is serious about helping reduce rates of food insecurity in Nunavut, they need to support existing community capacities that are based on Inuit values of sharing to ensure people are able to meet their food needs.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31C1TV9T
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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