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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ZS2KT1H

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Pregnancy and Motherhood: Prejudice, Stereotyping and Discrimination in the Canadian Workplace Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
motherhood
duty to accommodate
pregnancy
glass ceiling
Brooks v Safeway Canada
maternity protection laws
Royal Commission on Equality in Employment
feminist movement
freedom of contract
parental leave
gender role stereotypes
maternity leave
gender equality
employment discrimination
mommy-track
paternity leave
work-family policies
human rights laws
Bliss v Attorney General
pregnancy discrimination
Royal Commission on the Status of Women
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Kapur, Shivani
Supervisor and department
Adams, Eric (Law)
Examining committee member and department
Acorn, Annalise (Law)
Lund, Anna (Law)
Department
Faculty of Law
Specialization

Date accepted
2017-06-16T15:52:08Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Laws
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis analyses discrimination against pregnant women and new mothers in Canadian workplaces, and examines how the current legal framework is insufficient to combat harmful stereotypes surrounding motherhood that result in subtle forms of pregnancy discrimination. It argues that the parental leave policy in Canada has, by failing to disrupt the gendered patterns of parental leave taking, perpetuated traditional sex-role stereotypes that continue to impede women’s workplace equality. It suggests father targeted leave to help breakdown these gender role stereotypes, and to degenderize traditional work and family roles resulting in a more egalitarian distribution of employment and family responsibilities. This thesis proceeds in three chapters. Chapter I of this thesis traces the history of discrimination against pregnant workers. Chapter II discusses the social context that led to the emergence of contemporary legal protections available to expectant and new mothers. Chapter III examines how the parental leave policy has failed to challenge the gendered leave-taking patterns, and suggests Québec’s paternity leave program as a model for the rest of the nation to allow both parents to equally engage in parenting and paid employment, thus, achieving true gender equality.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ZS2KT1H
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication
"Pregnancy discrimination persists in the workplace, Edmonton researcher says", CBC News (3 February 2017) online: ."Pregnancy discrimination lives at work", UAlberta (27 January 2017) online: .

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