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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FN1147D

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Glucose Responsive Microgel Modified Quartz Crystal Microbalances as a Glucose Sensor Open Access

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Subject/Keyword
GlucoseThe Serpe group has shown that optical devices can be fabricated by layering poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgels onto a gold-coated glass substrate and then depositing another gold layer on top. These devices, called etalons, exhibit optical properties that depend on many characteristics, primarily temperature. Temperature is the most basic property of pNIPAm-based microgels, as it changes their solvation state. In this study, we modified pNIPAm-based microgels with 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA), which renders them responsive to glucose; i.e., they change size in a glucose-dependent fashion. By modifying the Au surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with etalons composed of these microgels, we can make QCM-based devices that shift frequency as a function of glucose concentration in buffer solution. Again, this is a result of the microgels’ changing solvation state in response to glucose. It was determined that glucose-responsive pNIPAm microgel-based QCM can be used as a glucose sensor. This dissertation will detail the work done on these systems.
Sensor
Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM)
poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Cho, Chung Yeon
Supervisor and department
Michael, Serpe (Chemistry)
Examining committee member and department
Glenn, Loppnow (Chemistry)
James, Harynuk (Chemistry)
Department
Department of Chemistry
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-12-23T10:54:51Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The Serpe group has shown that optical devices can be fabricated by layering poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) microgels onto a gold-coated glass substrate and then depositing another gold layer on top. These devices, called etalons, exhibit optical properties that depend on many characteristics, primarily temperature. Temperature is the most basic property of pNIPAm-based microgels, as it changes their solvation state. In this study, we modified pNIPAm-based microgels with 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA), which renders them responsive to glucose; i.e., they change size in a glucose-dependent fashion. By modifying the Au surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with etalons composed of these microgels, we can make QCM-based devices that shift frequency as a function of glucose concentration in buffer solution. Again, this is a result of the microgels’ changing solvation state in response to glucose. It was determined that glucose-responsive pNIPAm microgel-based QCM can be used as a glucose sensor. This dissertation will detail the work done on these systems.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FN1147D
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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