ERA

No preview available

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R36688J85

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Behavioural Medicine & Health Psychology

Ease of Imagination, Message Framing and Physical Activity Messages Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Berry, T. R.
Carson, V.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Health-risk
Integration
Attitudes
Mental-imagery
Behaviors
Prevention
Framed messages
Model
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Abstract: Objectives. The purpose of this research was to replicate a study that examined how message framing and ease of imagination interact to influence attitudes towards the prevention of heart disease through physical activity and a healthy diet. Changes were made such that only physical activity behaviour was profiled and assessed as a moderating variable. It was hypothesized that gain-framed messages would positively influence attitudes with hard to imagine symptoms, that loss-framed messages would positively influence attitudes with easy to imagine symptoms and exercise frequency would moderate the findings. Design. This study employed a 2 ( easy or hard to imagine symptoms) by 2 (gain- or loss-framed) Solomon square design whereby participants, half of whom completed a pre-test, were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: easy to imagine/gain-framed, hard to imagine/gain-framed, easy to imagine/loss-framed, or hard to imagine/loss-framed. Methods. Participants included adults over the age of 55 years (N = 57) and undergraduate students (18-22 years; N = 118). They were described either hard to imagine or easy to imagine symptoms of heart disease and diabetes and asked to imagine them. Participants then read either a gain- or loss-framed physical activity message followed by post-test questionnaires that assessed attitudes, exercise frequency, and demographics. Results. Regression analyses showed no significant framing effects but significant effects for ease of imagination and exercise frequency as a moderating variable. Conclusions. This study failed to replicate the original research findings but showed that participants who exercised the least and were in the hard to imagine condition had the worst attitudes towards physical activity.
Date created

DOI
doi:10.7939/R36688J85
License information
Rights
© 2010 British Psychological Society...
Citation for previous publication
Berry, T. R., & Carson, V. (2010). Ease of Imagination, Message Framing and Physical Activity Messages. British Journal of Health Psychology, 15, 197 – 211. DOI: 10.1348/135910709X447811
Source
Link to related item

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T00:19:28.961+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: html (Hypertext Markup Language, Microsoft Word)
Mime type: text/html
File size: 147968
Last modified: 2016:10:29 01:54:11-06:00
Filename: Berry & Carson, Ease of Imagination and Message Framing_post-print.doc
Original checksum: 2bca4fd4edb9135103b5f65725db61c6
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Document contains no html, head, body or title tags
Markup basis: HTML
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date