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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NP1WP93

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Impact of Grazing on Alberta’s Northern Temperate Grasslands Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
sub-region
diversity
grassland
montane
parkland
Mixedgrass
biomass
livestock
grazing
carbon
vegetation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lyseng, Mark Patrick
Supervisor and department
Bork, Edward (Agriculture, Food, & Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Chang, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Carlyle, Cameron (Agriculture, Food, & Nutritional Science)
Willms, Walter (Agriculture Canada)
Irving, Barry (Agriculture, Food, & Nutritional Science)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Rangeland &Wildlife Resources
Date accepted
2016-02-23T10:16:10Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Understanding factors affecting elemental carbon stocks on Alberta’s grasslands is of special importance with recent policy shifts focusing on climate change and carbon (C) emissions. A large part of Alberta is native prairie utilized by the beef industry. This study examined soil and vegetation over more than a hundred Alberta grassland sites to better understand the effects that regional climate and grazing have on grassland C. Overall, grazing maintained plant production and increased vegetation diversity. In high precipitation environments, grazing tended to reduce woody species, favor introduced plants, and increase herb production as well as total C stores. Grazing decreased C mass in litter, but led to more C mass in soil, especially in regions with higher precipitation (>475mm). These results suggest that grazing is an important component for maintaining large C masses in soil.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NP1WP93
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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Last modified: 2016:06:16 16:52:53-06:00
Filename: Grazing and EG&S - Thesis - Mark Lyseng (3).pdf
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