ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Autonomous Mothers and Social Policy: How the CCTB, UCCB, and Alberta Child Care Subsidies Govern Women's Autonomy in MotherhoodDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R32B8VP27

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Autonomous Mothers and Social Policy: How the CCTB, UCCB, and Alberta Child Care Subsidies Govern Women's Autonomy in Motherhood Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Child Care
Autonomy
Motherhood
Alberta
Canada
Public Policy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Challborn, Margot R.
Supervisor and department
Dr. Lois Harder (Political Science
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Lois Harder (Political Science)
Dr. Lois Harder (Political Science), Dr. Cressida Heyes (Political Science and Philosophy), Dr. Sheena Wilson (English and Cultural Studies, Campus St. Jean)
Dr. Sheena Wilson (English and Cultural Studies, Campus St. Jean)
Dr. Cressida Heyes (Political Science and Philosophy)
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2016-01-18T15:25:22Z
Graduation date
2016-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Liberalism’s conceit is the separation of the private from the public sphere, a conceit that, in turn, supports a common sense in which families are understood to be private entities that exist outside the purview of the state. And yet, Canadian income support programs clearly demonstrate the state’s interest in the organization of Canadian families. This thesis examines the policy processes and rationales through which autonomous mothering, or choosing to mother without a co-parent, is understood and addressed in Canadian social policy and provincial social policy in Alberta. Using a feminist critical policy analysis of the Canada Child Tax Benefit, the Universal Child Care Benefit, and child care subsidies in Alberta and a feminist critical discourse analysis of legislative debates, I examine political engagement surrounding childcare policies in Canada and Alberta from 1996-2015. I conclude that Canada’s federal government and the province of Alberta idealize and favour, in political speech and policy design, the traditional nuclear family form, creating material, social, and political hardship for women who choose to parent without a co-parent.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R32B8VP27
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2016-01-18T22:25:33.352+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 831743
Last modified: 2016:06:16 17:03:11-06:00
Filename: Challborn_Margot_201601_MA.pdf
Original checksum: ace9de124c205068033481ba456045c3
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date