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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3KW7R

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Current practices for evaluation of resonance disorders in North America Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
evaluation
best practices
hypernasality
resonance disorders
survey
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Huebert, Elizabeth
Supervisor and department
Boliek, Carol (Speech-Pathology and Audiology)
Hagler, Paul (Speech-Pathology and Audiology)
Examining committee member and department
Chapman, Sherry-Ann (Community-University Partnership for the Study of Children, Youth, and Families)
Rieger, Jana (Speech-Pathology and Audiology)
Department
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-07-03T15:12:09Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Thirty-eight clinicians were surveyed regarding their current clinical practices in assessing, tracking treatment and determining discharge criteria for clients with resonance disorders. When these results were compared with recommendations from the literature for best practices, it was found that: (a) most clinicians were using low-tech assessment tools (such as perceptual assessment) at least some of the time, (b) many clinicians were not using high-tech assessment tools (such as videofluoroscopy) simply because they lacked access to such tools, and (c) clinicians are remarkably similar in their clinical practices across a wide variety of circumstances (such as age, and employment setting). The primary recommendation accruing from these findings was that more high-tech assessment tools should be routinely available to clinicians practicing in this area. More consistent use of sophisticated assessment devices would exemplify contemporary thinking about transfer of knowledge to practice in the area of resonance disorders assessment and improve patient outcomes.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3KW7R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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