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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VQ30

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Theses and Dissertations

A spectroscopic approach for inferring charcoal concentrations and fire history from lacustrine sediments Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Paleofire Reconstruction
Holocene Fire History
Spectroscopy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jones, Emma Virginia
Supervisor and department
Wolfe, Alexander (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
MacKenzie, Derek (Renewable Resources)
Wolfe, Alexander (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Douglas, Marianne (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-04-25T09:00:02Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Current wildfire activity highlights the precarious ecological state of for- ests owing to the combined effects of climate change and management practices. Because the analysis of long-term fire frequency from sedimentary archives is critical to understanding fire dynamics, there is a continuous need to refine meth- odologies used to reconstruct fire frequency and intensity. Visible-near infrared (VNIR) spectroscopy offers a rapid and non-destructive method for remotely sensing charcoal concentrations from lacustrine sediment cores. In this study, a predictive model for quantifying charcoal concentrations from lake sediment absorbance was developed and subsequently applied to an 8000 year sediment record from Grand Teton National Park (Wyoming, USA). This record provides a detailed continuous fire history that captures regional fire trends obtained by optically counted charcoal from nearby lakes. The novel spectroscopic method for charcoal quantification reduces laboratory processing time tremendously and avoids various biases associated with conventional optical microscopic charcoal enumeration techniques.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VQ30
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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