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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3JD4Q36D

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Robert Lepage's Stravinsky: Rhyming Imagery on Stage Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Drama
The Nightingale and Other Short Fables
The Rake's Progress
Lepage, Robert
Frame Analysis
Ghosting
Defamiliarization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nearey, Brendan P.J.
Supervisor and department
Muneroni, Stefano (Drama)
Defraeye, Piet (Drama)
Examining committee member and department
Reyns, Chris (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Nicholls, Sandra (Drama)
Department
Department of Drama
Specialization

Date accepted
2017-09-29T13:31:26Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Québécois Director/Writer/Performer/Filmmaker Robert Lepage is internationally recognized for his striking multimedia productions and transformative mise-en-scène. This thesis specifically explores Lepage’s staging of two Igor Stravinsky operas: The Rake’s Progress (2007), and The Nightingale and Other Short Fables (2009). This is not a musicological study, rather it is an analysis of the mise-en-scène Lepage devised for these productions. Lepage employs a specific method of seeking commonalities between disparate stage imagery, and orchestrating radical transformations of the stage picture around those reoccurring elements, using them as reference points for his audience. These reference points are to his stage picture what homonyms and rhymes are to poetry; they change meaning based on context, and resonate with the spectator on more than one level. Using tools described in Erving Goffman’s Frame Analysis (1976), and Marvin Carlson’s The Haunted Stage (2003), I approach Lepage’s mise-en-scène as a layering of intersecting frames. Secondly, a close reading and analysis approaches the mise-en-scène of Lepage’s The Rake’s Progress (2007) as a form of adaptation, drawing from Linda Hutcheon’s A Theory of Adaptation (2013). Finally, I examine The Nightingale (2009) with a libretto based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale of the same name, on its emulation of 19th century chinoiserie, using principles from Edward Said’s Orientalisim (1978).
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3JD4Q36D
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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Last modified: 2017:11:08 18:13:10-07:00
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