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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3GH9BH8H

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Feral Objects in a Classroom Ecology Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Feral Objects
Object Oriented Ontology
Classroom
Deleuze
Assemblages
Zines
Shaun Tan
Stick Figures
Where the Wild Things Are
affect
ethics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Grauwiler, Aimee S. A.
Supervisor and department
Wallin, Jason (Department of Secondary Education)
Examining committee member and department
jagodzinski, jan (Department of Secondary Education)
Pente, Patti (Department of Elementary Education)
Wallin, Jason (Department of Secondary Education)
Department
Department of Secondary Education
Specialization

Date accepted
2016-09-29T10:08:19Z
Graduation date
2016-06:Fall 2016
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
While it has become a generally accepted idea that humans have been endowed with authority over all that exists on this earth, this thesis will argue that, at times, this is not the case. Belief in this sort of authority proves to be problematic in a classroom environment as things assert alternative ways of being, challenging a human centric environment and what may be the guiding believes of the educational system. I begin by establishing the classroom as a space endowed with purity, affiliated with domestic life referencing the Deleuzian concept of arboreal thinking. Turning to several writers of object oriented ontology, I then examine examples of feral objects that prove to be monstrous when introduced to the domesticated environment of the classroom. These feral objects not only challenge established hierarchies but also suggest that humans may not be in absolute control. In conclusion, this thesis examines the power objects hold within the ecology of the classroom and the potential these objects hold to suggest alternative ways of being in our world.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3GH9BH8H
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
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