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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31C1TV8B

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Wettability Alteration by Chemical Agents at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures to Improve Heavy-Oil Recovery Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
High Temperature
New Chemical
Wettability Alteration
EOR
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Wei,You
Supervisor and department
Babadagli, Tayfun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Li, Huazhou (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Kuru, Ergun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Babadagli, Tayfun (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization
Petroleum Engineering
Date accepted
2017-08-29T10:04:49Z
Graduation date
2017-11:Fall 2017
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The thermal method is the primary method used to improve the recovery from reservoirs with heavy or extra-heavy oil. However, the efficiency and economic costliness of the traditional thermal process are limited by the unfavorable interfacial properties of heavy oil/water (steam)/rock system. Therefore, chemicals that can change the wettability and reduce the interfacial tension have been added to hot-water or steam to improve the efficiency of thermal recovery methods. This thesis aimed at screening thermal-resistant chemicals as interfacial modifiers to improve the heavy oil recovery and further investigating their working mechanism on the nanoscale. Different types of new chemicals were tested in this study. High pH solution, ionic liquid, surfactants, and nanoparticles are evaluated by their thermal stability, interfacial alteration, and recovery improvement. The stability of the chemicals was tested through TGA (thermal gravimetric analysis) at steam temperature up 400℃. The theoretically optimized concentration that led to the lowest surface energy was achieved by measuring the interfacial tension between crude oil and solutions with various concentrations. The suitability of the chemicals as wettability modifiers for different rock types was evaluated by contact angle measurements at high temperature and high pressure. Wettability alteration mechanism was further analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM), which provided the topography change of mica or calcite surface, which illustrated the deposition of the chemicals and removal of the existing oil layer. Imbibition tests were performed on sandstone and limestone cores with screened promising modifiers at 90 and 180℃.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31C1TV8B
Rights
This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private, scholarly or scientific research. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.
Citation for previous publication
Wei, You and Babadagli, Tayfun. (2016). Selection of Proper Chemicals to Improve the Performance of Steam Based Thermal Applications in Sands and Carbonates. SPE Latin America and Caribbean Heavy and Extra Heavy Oil Conference, Lima, Peru, 19-20 October.  https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-181209-MSWei
, You and Babadagli, Tayfun. (2017). Selection of New Generation Chemicals as Steam Additive for Cost Effective Heavy-Oil Recovery Applications. SPE Canada Heavy Oil Technical Conference, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 15-16 February.  https://www.onepetro.org/conference-paper/SPE-184975-MS

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