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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V93V

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Long-term agronomic and environmental impact of aspen control strategies in the Aspen Parkland Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
range managemetn
net present value
agronomic
aspen
aspen parkland
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
LaRade, Shawna Elizabeth
Supervisor and department
Bork, Edward
Examining committee member and department
Willms, Walter
Jeffrey, Scott
Irving, Barry
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-27T17:33:49Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Since European settlement the Aspen Parkland has been subject to agricultural intensification. This research assessed the agronomic, ecologic and economic impact of native Parkland conversion into tame pasture, by building on a study initiated in 1980 investigating the short-term agronomic responses within three landscape-level treatments: an intensive Clear & Break (C&B), a Spray & Burn (S&B) and a burnt Native Check (NC). Historical information was supplemented with recently collected data (2005-2006). Production remained high within the NC relative to the others after 25 years, in part due to contributions from browse in areas with increasing woody species. Plant species composition also demonstrated considerable convergence (i.e. overlap) between native and tame grasslands, and although not different in soil organic matter, microfaunal activity differed marginally. Net present value (NPV) economic analysis indicated the NC and S&B provided greater aggregate returns over the study period, and has implications for aspen management in the future.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V93V
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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