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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QK6H

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Regional Hydrogeology of Southwestern Saskatchewan Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
regional
fluid flow
southwestern
hydrogeology
Saskatchewan
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Melnik, Anatoly
Supervisor and department
Rostron, Benjamin (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Toth, Jozsef (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Mendoza, Carl (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Rostron, Benjamin (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Chalaturnyk, Rick (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization
Geology
Date accepted
2012-03-30T11:23:35Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Twelve deep aquifers and 12 aquitards were defined in southwestern Saskatchewan. Four major water types were identified: Type 1 (Ca-SO4) freshwaters, found in Paleozoic aquifers; Type 2 (Na-Cl) brines, found in all aquifers; Type 3 (Na-SO4) waters, mixture of Type 1 and Type 2 waters; and Type 4 (Na-HCO3) meteoric waters, found mainly in Mesozoic aquifers. Total Dissolved Solids range from >300 g/L in Paleozoic aquifers to <25 g/L in Cretaceous and shallow aquifers. Fluid flow in the Paleozoic aquifers is directed towards the north. Water in the Lower Cretaceous aquifers flows from the Alberta Basin towards the east and northeast. Fluid flow in the Upper Cretaceous aquifer is controlled by local topography. Significant density effects exist in the Lower Paleozoic aquifers only. Hydrodynamic effects on hydrocarbon accumulations have been observed in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous aquifers.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QK6H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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