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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3J64D

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Microfabrication and characterization of carbon/molecule/metal molecular junctions Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
electron transport
microfabrication
molecular junction
carbon materials
molecular electronics
microelectronics
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ru, Jie
Supervisor and department
McCreery, Richard L. (Chemistry)
Examining committee member and department
Evoy, Stephane (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
McDermott, Mark T. (Chemistry)
Department
Department of Chemistry
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-12-15T13:20:55Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Carbon/molecule/Cu/Au molecular junctions were fabricated on 4-inch silicon wafers using microfabrication techniques common in commercial semiconductor manufacturing. Electron-beam deposited carbon films are introduced as substrates, and the junctions exhibited high yield and excellent reproducibility. Current density-voltage characteristics of the devices were area scaling, weakly dependent on temperature and exponentially on molecular film thickness, and quantitatively similar to those of devices made with other techniques reported previously in our group, which contained pyrolyzed photoresist films as substrates. Furthermore, the test of cycle life and thermal stability reveals that the devices can survive at least under several millions of potential cycles at room temperature in air, and elevated temperature up to 150 °C in vacuum for >40 hours. Parallel fabrication, thermal stability, and high yield are required for practical applications of molecular electronics, and the reported results provide important steps toward integration of molecular electronic devices with commercial processes and devices.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3J64D
Rights
License granted by Jie Ru (jru@ualberta.ca) on 2010-12-07T20:52:14Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:36:18-06:00
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File title: Ru_Jie_Spring 2011_1.pdf
File title: Microsoft Word - final version.doc
File author: Jie Ru
Page count: 179
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