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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QB9VD8T

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Hyperspectral remote sensing of boreal forest tree diversity at multiple scales Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
sensing
biodiversity
boreal
forest
remote
hyperspectral
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
DeLancey, Evan R.
Supervisor and department
Gamon, John A. (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Hik, David (Biological Sciences)
Rivard, Benoit (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-03-31T15:41:51Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This research compared the variability/diversity of spectral information captured with spectrometers at the airborne, field, and leaf level to tree species diversity. Airborne measurements were made over the North Saskatchewan River Valley while field and leaf measurements were done with synthetic tree plots on the roof of the Biological Sciences building, University of Alberta. Measures of optical diversity (spectral variables), such as the standard deviation in vegetation indices, principal components, and slope analysis, showed significant correlation to species diversity indices. The strongest correlations (R2: ODI#3 = 0.90, ODI#6 = 0.86) were achieved with linear models using three to five spectral variables, called Optical Diversity Indices (ODIs). Experimental methods found that this correlation was based primarily on variation in leaf optical properties. Additionally, rough canopies increased optical diversity and greater spectral range improved correlations slightly. These findings can help design operational methods for remote assessment of biodiversity based on optical diversity.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QB9VD8T
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: DeLancey_Evan_Winter 2014
File author: Evan DeLancey
Page count: 113
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