ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of An observational study of social media technology conversations: Exploring how members of the Alberta public, organizations and health care professionals express wellness, in relation to childrenDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34B2XC9R

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

An observational study of social media technology conversations: Exploring how members of the Alberta public, organizations and health care professionals express wellness, in relation to children Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
children's wellness
social media technology
observational study
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Martz, Patricia A
Supervisor and department
Menon, Devidas (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Menon, Devidas (Public Health Sciences)
Street, Jackie (Public Health Sciences)
Stafinski, Tania (Public Health Sciences)
Philippon, Don (Public Health Sciences)
Department
Department of Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Health Policy Research
Date accepted
2015-09-21T11:52:16Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The October 2013 release of the Alberta Strategic Approach to Wellness - Health for All…. Wellness for Life, indicated that the Government of Alberta wanted to engage Albertans in conversations about wellness. Therefore, the objective of this thesis was to ascertain how Albertans express wellness in their social media technology conversations, and in particular, what dimensions of wellness they commonly express with respect to children’s wellness. This study explored the social media technology conversations generated by Albertans using Twitter™ and the content of Alberta on-line news media and on-line blog articles that had a focus on children’s wellness. The content analysis of Twitter™ data was made possible through use of the computer program NodeXL™, and the creation of an additional computer program, referred to in this study as the Hamman Program. The latter was designed specifically to streamline the process of identifying Alberta generated Twitter™ data. The findings of this study have led to a deeper understanding of public conversations around children’s wellness, the possibilities of social media research, and how the study of social media technology conversations can contribute to government policy agenda setting.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34B2XC9R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2015-09-21T17:52:17.704+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 2106304
Last modified: 2016:06:24 17:46:11-06:00
Filename: Martz_Patricia_A_201509_MSc.pdf
Original checksum: ec32c51d9a82e08295dfea656f547909
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date