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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FF3M53N

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Wicked Problems and Professional Work: Disrupting Work in a Mature Field with Incumbent Professions Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Mature Fields
Professional Practice
Institutional Change
Disrupting Action
Professions
Fields
Institutional Work
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Huq, Jo-Louise
Supervisor and department
Reay, Trish (Faculty of Business)
Examining committee member and department
Suddaby, Roy (Faculty of Business)
Karapetrovic, Stanislav (Mechanical Engineering)
Washington, Marvin (Faculty of Business)
Zilber, Tamar (Organizational Behavior)
Department
Faculty of Business
Specialization
Strategic Management and Organization
Date accepted
2015-09-08T13:46:04Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The emerging institutional work perspective implicates agency and action in institutional dynamics in contrast to the traditional organizational institutional approach. In this dissertation, my objective was to explore institutional disrupting work in a mature field with incumbent professions. I developed a two-part case study of the Alberta addictions treatment field. The first part of the case study explored disrupting work at the field level, the second part at the level of professional practice. Data collection included interviews, observations, and documents. My findings show that at the field level and at the level of practice actors’ actions were disrupting to institutionalized arrangements and practices of professional work. At the field level, I identified three forms of disrupting work: complexifying work, boundary work, and temporal work. At the practice level, I also identified three forms of disrupting work: configuring work, adapting work, and boundary work. I developed three models of disrupting a field level model, a practice level model, and a multi-level model. My research sheds light on disrupting and how disrupting interrupts the institutionalized arrangements and practices of incumbent professions, both of which, despite scholars’ interest in action and agency in institutional life, remain overlooked in empirical research.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FF3M53N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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