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Performing and transforming “the second life”: Music and HIV/AIDS activism in South Africa Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
music
HIV/AIDS
semiotics
medical anthropology
activism
ethnomusicology
stigma
advocacy
social change
identity
South Africa
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Whittaker, Laryssa Karen
Supervisor and department
Spinetti, Federico (Music)
Examining committee member and department
Fletcher, Christopher (Anthropology)
Frishkopf, Michael (Music)
Qureshi, Regula (Music)
Department
Department of Music
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-06-08T19:45:20Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
MA
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) in South Africa experience a stigmatised HIV status which threatens to supplant their prior identities. This compounds the marginalization on multiple social levels experienced by those most vulnerable to infection as they cope with associations of death and disease, as well as perceptions of guilt, shame and personal responsibility built into the moral discourse with which the subject of HIV is laden. My thesis explores the grassroots activism of groups and individuals in South Africa who musically advocate for support and social acceptance of PLWHAs within a volatile post-apartheid sociopolitical environment where government intervention has been controversial, inconsistent and, in terms of advocacy, largely absent. I argue, using Thomas Turino’s Peircian theory of semiotics, that my research participants draw upon the indexical characteristics of their music to assert social, religious and ethnic identities in the construction of alternative, healthy HIV-positive identities.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Laryssa Whittaker (laryssa@ualberta.ca) on 2010-06-08T18:35:15Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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