ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Examination of Wet Meadow Creation as a Restoration Option for Extracted Peatland Sites in AlbertaDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3D50G57Q

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Examination of Wet Meadow Creation as a Restoration Option for Extracted Peatland Sites in Alberta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
peatland
fertilization
spreading
transfer method
restoration
re-vegetation
wet meadow
diaspore
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Critchley, Michael D
Supervisor and department
Foote, Lee (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Rochefort, Line (Plant Sciences- University of Laval)
Foote, Lee (Renewable Resources)
Belland, Rene (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Conservation Biology
Date accepted
2014-04-02T09:19:42Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Question: Can a wet meadow plant community be established on abandoned peatlands through broadcast plant diaspore spreading in western Canada? Does fertilization impact the development and establishment of the wet meadow? Location: Evansburg, Alberta, Canada Methods: Wet meadow vascular and non-vascular species were spread under 2 treatments on an abandoned peatland. The effect of spreading and fertilization treatments were tested using a factorial randomized unbalanced design repeated six times. Treatments were used to statistically test main effects and interactions. A barley (Hordeum vulgare) straw mulch cover was applied on all experimental units. Results: Plant spreading was an effective restoration method for establishing vascular wet meadow vegetation on sites with sufficient moisture. The treatments that included plant spreading had 80% coverage by wetland dependent vegetation and a distinct decline in agronomic and upland species. Fertilization had no significant effect on plant cover. Conclusion: The use of a modified Sphagnum moss layer transfer method to establish a wet meadow plant community on a post-abandoned peatland was successful and contributes to the development of a new approach towards managing abandoned peatlands in mid-continental boreal Alberta, Canada.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3D50G57Q
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-06-15T07:04:58.220+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1522030
Last modified: 2015:10:12 16:37:06-06:00
Filename: Critchley_Michael_Winter2014.pdf
Original checksum: 9ac37e5fcc0bec5289b08a103b4d1fd3
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Unexpected error in findFonts java.lang.ClassCastException: edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfSimpleObject cannot be cast to edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfDictionary offset=1499686
Status message: Invalid Annotation list offset=1499686
Status message: Outlines contain recursive references.
File title: Chapter I: General Introduction
File language: EN-US
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date