ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of The Role of Attention and Perception in the Control of Visually Guided and Memory-Guided ActionsDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3231W

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

The Role of Attention and Perception in the Control of Visually Guided and Memory-Guided Actions Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Perception
Action
Attention
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Armstrong, Graeme A B
Supervisor and department
Singhal, Anthony (Psychology/Neuroscience)
Examining committee member and department
Treit, Dallas (Psychology/Neuroscience)
Caplan, Jeremy (Psychology/Neuroscience)
Pearson, Keir (Physiology/Neuroscience)
Collins, David (Physical Education and Recreation/Neuroscience)
Department
Centre for Neuroscience
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-09-28T12:42:47Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
I investigated the attentional and perceptional mechanisms involved in the control of visually guided and memory-guided actions in two experiments using event-related potentials (ERPS). In the first dual task experiment, participants performed reciprocal aiming in visually guided and memory-guided modes while simultaneously performing a dichotic listening task from which ERPs were collected. A decrease in mismatch negativity (MMN) component amplitude during visually guided aiming suggests that it requires more automatic attention, and an increase in P300 component latency during memory-guided aiming suggests that it requires more voluntary attention. In the second experiment, ERPs were collected while participants were presented with pictures of tools and, after a delay, either pantomimed how each tool was used (go) or did nothing (no-go). No differences in perception-related N170 amplitude were found between go and no-go trials but limitations of this experiment impede conclusions as to the role of N170 mechanisms in delayed action planning.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3231W
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Armstrong, G.A.B., and Singhal, A. (2011). Neural markers of automatic and controlled attention during immediate and delayed action. Experimental Brain Research, 213, 35-48.

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T00:18:58.857+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1217541
Last modified: 2015:10:12 20:42:14-06:00
Filename: Armstrong_Graeme_Fall 2012.pdf
Original checksum: a3ef29a9c63625dabf5c432cca8ab31e
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Unexpected error in findFonts java.lang.ClassCastException: edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfSimpleObject cannot be cast to edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfDictionary offset=2927
Page count: 108
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date