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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M32NG2B

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Women's Work, Tools, and Expertise: Hide Tanning and the Archaeological Record Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Traditional Hide Tanning
Feminist Archaeology
Tipi Rings
Promontory Caves
Tabular Bifaces
Besant Phase
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Reilly, Aileen
Supervisor and department
Ives, John (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Main Johnson, Leslie (Anthropology)
Gruhn, Ruth (Anthropology)
Palmer, Andie (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-05-11T13:44:04Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Hide tanning is a technological innovation that spans tens of thousands of years. Without it, humans would not have been able to expand into harsh and unforgiving environments. Despite the importance and time depth of this act, hide tanning remains an often-overlooked aspect of the archaeological record. Some of this neglect can be attributed to the fact that the products of hide tanning rarely preserve in archaeological settings. What is more commonly encountered are the tools used to facilitate the transformation of an animal skin into a fully usable hide. However, the tools are but a small portion of the knowledge system that comprises this task, and at times even these tools are the subjects of confusion (as is the case with tabular bifaces). By drawing upon multiple lines of evidence, including the high fidelity record of the Promontory Caves, hide requirements for tipi rings, use wear analyses, and the expert knowledge of community members, it is possible to acquire a much greater understanding of how the act of working hides shaped the lives of women; and how they in turn, shaped the archaeological record.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M32NG2B
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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