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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3NK36D32

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Removal of Organic and Inorganic Contaminants from Oil Sands Tailings using Carbon Based Adsorbents and Native Sediment Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Contaminants
Petroleum Coke
Naphthenic Acids
Oil Sands
Adsorption
Biochar
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Stewart, Matthew
Supervisor and department
Ulrich, Ania (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
MacKenzie, Derek (Renewable Resources)
Ulrich, Ania (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Wilson, Ward (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Specialization
Geoenvironmental Engineering
Date accepted
2013-09-24T15:49:21Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The extraction and refinement of oil sands bitumen produces substantial quantities of liquid tailings and solid coke. Tailings contain metals and naphthenic acids, which require remediation before mine closure. Adsorption is a potential remediation technique which may reuse stockpiled petroleum coke. This thesis investigates the adsorption of contaminants on sediment, petroleum coke and biochar. The determination of naphthenic acid concentration using ESI-FTICR-MS was also explored. Results suggest limited adsorption of naphthenic acids on sediment occurred, while petroleum coke and biochar removed elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids and metals. Pretreating petroleum coke by acid washing increased its ability to adsorb contaminants by removing surface bound impurities. Electrospray ionization was a strong semi-qualitative tool for naphthenic acid measurement, but deviated significantly from other methods for quantitative measurement. In summary, the adsorption of oil sands contaminants is feasible using carbonaceous adsorbents. Metal release was limited when pretreated petroleum coke and biochar was used.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3NK36D32
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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