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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3P26Q955

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Words Apart: A Reading of Canadian Labor Conflict Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
language
Labor conflict
Discourse Analysis
Industrial Relations
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Keim, Charles A
Supervisor and department
Reshef, Yonatan (Strategic Management and Organization)
Examining committee member and department
Deephouse, David (Strategic Management and Organization)
Inness, Michelle (Strategic Management and Organization)
Luchak, Andrew (Strategic Management and Organization)
Suddaby, Roy (Strategic Management and Organization)
Gould, Anthony (Industrial Relations; Laval University)
Department
Faculty of Business
Specialization
Strategic Management and Organization
Date accepted
2015-01-15T08:53:36Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
This thesis examines the role that language plays in labor conflict. Nelson (2003: 449) argues that words are necessary for conflict: words initiate, maintain, elevate, defuse, and can resolve human conflict. My study follows Nelson in an exploration of how language was mobilized during the Alberta Teachers’ strike (2001—2002). Both the Klein-led conservative government and the Booi-led Alberta Teachers’ Association used language to present images, stories, and explanations that cast themselves and the conflict in very different ways. Speakers used language to create groups and engineer the conflict: they were “words” as well as “worlds” apart. To facilitate an examination of how speakers used language to construct and polarize these worlds a framework of four discursive strategies is applied.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3P26Q955
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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