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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QW8C

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An Exploratory Study of Ethnic Differences in Parent Cultural Socialization Practices and Children’s Experiences of Peer Ethnic Victimization Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Middle Childhood
Parent Cultural Socialization Practices
Ethnic Differences
Exploratory Study
Peer Ethnic Victimization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Chakawa, Ayanda
Supervisor and department
Hoglund, Wendy (Department of Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Noels, Kim (Department of Psychology)
Galambos, Nancy (Department of Psychology)
Nicoladis, Elena (Department of Psychology)
Rinaldi, Christina (Department of Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-07-18T13:05:01Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Research suggests that visible ethnic minority parents engage in cultural socialization practices and that visible ethnic minority children experience peer ethnic victimization more often than ethnic majority Caucasian children. Limited research has assessed ethnic differences in the construct validity and psychometric properties of measures assessing parent cultural socialization practices and peer ethnic victimization. This study examines ethnic differences in the construct validity and psychometric properties (reliabilities, mean levels) of these measures and in the associations between these constructs. Participants included 439 kindergarten to third-grade children and 275 of their parents from diverse ethnic groups. The constructs showed adequate construct validity across the overall visible ethnic minority and ethnic majority Caucasian groups. However, reliability was low at some waves for some ethnic groups. Relative to other ethnic groups, Southeast/East and West/South Asian parents engaged in more frequent cultural socialization practices and Black/African Canadian children experienced higher levels of peer ethnic victimization.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QW8C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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