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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VS8K

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The effect of school gardening and a healthy snack program on First Nations children’s knowledge and attitudes about vegetables and fruit, and their consumption of these foods at home Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
School gardening
First Nations children
Childhood obesity
Healthy snack program
Vegetable and fruit knowledge, attitudes and consumption
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Triador, Lucila
Supervisor and department
Willows, Noreen (Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Willows, Noreen (Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Farmer, Anna (Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health)
Maximova, Katerina (Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health)
Storey, Kate (Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization
Nutrition & Metabolism
Date accepted
2013-01-08T13:06:47Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Excess weight has a strong impact on First Nations children’s health. Adequate vegetable and fruit consumption is one way to potentially prevent children from having excess weight. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a 7-month school gardening and a 4-month healthy snack program on First Nations children’s knowledge and attitudes about vegetables and fruit, and their consumption of these foods at home. Anthropometric measures were taken to determine weight status. Caregiver’s food choices were documented. Children in this study (n=76) significantly increased their overall vegetable and fruit attitude score from baseline. Children liked foods that were familiar, which were those frequently consumed at home. Of the 60 children for whom we had anthropometric data, overweight/obesity (60%) and abdominal obesity (28.3%) were high. Caregivers’ diets indicated an integration of traditional and Western foods. Future garden-based interventions should ensure family participation to promote healthy eating behaviours in Aboriginal children.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VS8K
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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