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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R39134

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The Use of Demand-wise Shared Protection in Creating Topology Optimized High Availability Networks Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Network Design
High Availability
Network Survivability
Demand-wise shared protection
Network Topology
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Todd, Brody
Supervisor and department
Doucette, John (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Ingolfsson, Armann (Finance and Management Science)
Flynn, Peter (Mechanical Engineering)
Lipsett, Michael (Mechanical Engineering)
Doucette, John (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-10-01T20:49:20Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In order to meet the availability requirements of modern communication networks, a number of survivability techniques were developed that adapt the demand-wise shared protection design model to incorporate strategies increasing network availability. The survivability methodologies developed took two approaches. The first incorporated availability directly into the network design model. The second ensured minimum dual failure restorability was set within the model. These methodologies were developed for predetermined topologies, as well as to have topology optimization incorporated into the model. All methodologies were implemented and analyzed on a set of samples. The analysis examined cost, topology and actual availability of the network designs. Availability design was effective but computationally intensive and difficult to design. Minimum dual failure restorability was also effective in increasing availability with a significant caveat, dual failure restorability increased exposure to possible failures, and without sufficient levels of dual failure restorability could have a negative impact on availability.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R39134
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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