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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3X11Z

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Representing the Unrepresentable: A Critical Analysis of Staging Genocide Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Hotel Modern
Genocide
Rwanda 94
Groupov
Representation
Abject
Abjection
Unrepresentable
Kamp
Julia Kristeva
Theatre
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Moelker, Justine T
Supervisor and department
Defraeye, Piet (Department of Drama)
Examining committee member and department
Mounsef, Donia (Department of Drama)
Smith-Prei, Carrie (Modern Languages and Cultural Studies)
Defraeye, Piet (Department of Drama)
Department
Department of Drama
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-08-30T14:30:15Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This paper explores the theatrical staging of genocide using Julia Kristeva’s theory of abjection to highlight the impossibility of understanding and fully comprehending genocide. Traditional staging methods typically use a cohesive narrative structure which limits and edits the event to provide a stable conclusion. The debate of representing genocide does not centre solely on why one tries to stage these events but has shifted to emphasize how and if these events can be represented. Many theatre groups recognize the benefits of non-traditional staging methods. Groupov’s Rwanda 94 (2000) highlights the inability of the abject to be performed and the impossibility of containing genocide by the length of the production as well as the integration of several art forms. In the exploration of visuality in Hotel Modern’s Kamp (2005) the challenges of representing pain and violence are foregrounded. The ability to view the Holocaust is impacted by the intersection between film and the use of small puppets.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3X11Z
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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