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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M89M

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Composers of African Art Music in Contemporary Ghana: Locating Identities Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Ghana
music
identity
African art music
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Smith, Patrick F.
Supervisor and department
Frishkopf, Michael (Music)
Examining committee member and department
Thompson, Guy (History and Classics)
Gramit, David (Music)
Department
Department of Music
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-07-11T11:30:33Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
African art music composers in Ghanaian universities negotiate a multiplicity of identities in a time characterized by frequent international communication and travel. This thesis explores these identities and asks, what does African art music, a combination of Western and indigenous African musical elements, mean today? In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, European Christian missionaries introduced Ghanaians to Western styles of composition. During the pre-independence era, Ephraim Amu (1899–1995) first began to explore what it means to be African in the realm of Western-inspired art music by incorporating traditional music that could be appreciated by Ghanaians. Composers in subsequent generations, such as J. H. Kwabena Nketia (b. 1921), studied and continue to study and teach composition in Ghanaian and foreign universities, placing African art music amidst global flows of Western-inspired art musical practices. Students and professors at three Ghanaian universities navigate Christian, Pan-African, national, ethnic, and cosmopolitan identities through their compositions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M89M
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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