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Theses and Dissertations

Saving Face: Shame and Bodily Abnormality Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
acne
recognition
abnormality
shame
emotions
normalcy
ideals
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McMahen, Ben C
Supervisor and department
Wilson, Robert A (Philosophy)
Examining committee member and department
Griener, Glenn (Philosophy, Institute for Public Economics)
Janz, Heidi (John Dossetor Health Ethics Centre)
Morin, Marie-Eve (Philosophy)
Department
Department of Philosophy
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-01-30T13:09:48Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis is concerned with understanding the shame that often accompanies acne and acne scarring, as an instance of shame that accompanies bodily abnormality or disability, with the aim of exploring strategies of resistance. (1) I explore the explanandum by appealing to the language used by those suffering with acne, and the arguments used in advertisements that sell acne treatments. (2) I consider whether the commercial success of acne treatment products can be explained primarily by the widespread desire to attain a physical ideal, or in the desire to appear “normal.” This involves an analysis of “the ideal” and “the normal” more generally. (3) Since normality is inherently related to identity, I claim that desire for normalcy can be partly explained as the desire for recognition. (4) My account of emotion and shame demonstrates the possibility, and difficulty, in transforming our emotions through changes in perception of value, and environment.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File size: 478442
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:13:49-06:00
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File title: Microsoft Word - Ben McMahen Final Thesis Draft.docx
File author: Ben McMahen
Page count: 144
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