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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3WS8W

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Variable-length constrained-sequence codes Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Huffman
variable-length
recording
codes
constraint
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Steadman, Andrew
Supervisor and department
Fair, Ivan (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Krzymien, Witold (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Harms, Janelle (Computing Science)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-23T16:59:39Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The use of variable-length codes to construct capacity approaching constrained sequence codes is examined. Constrained sequence codes are commonly used for digital storage and transmission, but have historically been implemented using block codes. A new technique is developed for constructing variable-length constrained sequence codes. These codes are based on Huffman encoding various partial extensions, a technique that is shown to be optimal in the sense that no other technique can result in a higher code rate given the same partial extension. Partial extensions are exhaustively searched in order to identify the highest rate code within a particular bound. Examples of the technique are provided for various constraints, including (d,k) and DC-free constraints. These examples are shown to have average rates within 1% of capacity for their respective constraints. Tables are also provided listing the optimal sourceword to codeword length mappings for various other constraints.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3WS8W
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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