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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R39W3R

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Role of Glutamate and GABA in a mouse model expressing mutant human APP in the absence of NPC1 protein Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Cholesterol in the brain
Alzheimer's disease
GABA
Glutamate
NPC disease
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ghoshal, Bibaswan
Supervisor and department
Kar, Satyabrata (Psychiatry)
Examining committee member and department
Baker, Glen (Psychiatry)
Kerr, Bradley (Pharmacology)
LeMelledo, Jean-Michel (Psychiatry)
Department
Department of Psychiatry
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-01-28T11:46:31Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Cholesterol plays a critical role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To address this issue we have generated a line of ANPC transgenic mice that overexpress mutant-human amyloid precursor protein in the absence of cholesterol transporting Niemann Pick-type C1 protein. These mice display accelerated AD-related pathology compared to age-matched littermates. To define significance of GABA and glutamate in AD, we evaluated alterations of these systems in ANPC mice at different age groups. The levels of glutamate and GABA were not unaltered in ANPC mice compared to other lines. However, levels of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (i.e. VGLUT1), and expression of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 appeared to be decreased in ANPC mice. The levels/distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (i.e. GAD67) but not GAD65 were also decreased in the cerebellum of ANPC mice. Thus, cholesterol accumulation influences AD-related pathology and triggers subtle alterations in brain neurotransmitter system.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R39W3R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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