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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R38T10

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After the Earthquake: Dietary Resource Use During the Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Periods at Helike, Greece Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
stable nitrogen isotopes
stable isotope analysis
dietary reconstruction
stable carbon isotopes
dietary resource use
Helike, Greece
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McConnan Borstad, Courtney A
Supervisor and department
Garvie-Lok, Sandra (Anthropology)
Examining committee member and department
Haagsma, Margriet (History and Classics)
Garvie-Lok, Sandra (Anthropology)
Harrington, Lesley (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Anthropology
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-08-22T13:43:09Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
After a devastating earthquake and tsunami destroyed the Classical city of ancient Helike in 373 BC, the surrounding coastal plain was resettled and was continuously inhabited from the Hellenistic to the Late Byzantine periods. Twenty-eight individuals associated with these post-earthquake periods were analyzed for their bone collagen stable carbon (∂13C) and nitrogen (∂15N) isotope values. The results suggest that diet at Helike was based mainly upon terrestrial C3 plants and animals, with evidence for varying amounts of marine resource use between the time periods. Temporal differences in the human stable isotope values are attributed to the seismic activity of the Helike region, which resulted in the emergence and disappearance of several lagoons during antiquity, including one that had formed directly as a result of the earthquake in 373 BC.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R38T10
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File size: 6859519
Last modified: 2015:10:12 13:22:12-06:00
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Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Microsoft Word - Thesis Final Copy- use this one, it's the best.docx
File author: Courtney McBorstad
Page count: 219
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