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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VH62

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Characterization of Particulate Emissions of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Transient
Particulates
Volatility
HCCI
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Bullock, Dallin S
Supervisor and department
Olfert, Jason S (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Hayes, Robert E (Chemical Engineering)
Checkel, M David (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-09-05T15:38:55Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The particle size distribution, volatility, and effective density of particulate matter are measured using a cooperative fuel research engine during motoring, spark ignition, and homogeneous charge compression ignition. For all operating modes, less than 5% of the particulate mass remains when denuding the sample at 100 °C, and the particles for each operating mode have a relatively constant density with respect to particle size. A single cylinder engine with electromagnetic valves is used to test the effect of changing valve timing on particle emissions. An order of magnitude increase in particle concentration coincides with the valve timing changes, whereas the geometric mean diameter remains constant, suggesting that while the particle concentration increases due to timing changes, the mechanism for particle formation does not change. After a spike in particle concentration due to a timing change, the value quickly returns to steady-state levels.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VH62
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: Microsoft Word - Bullock Thesis Final.docx
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