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Genetic population structure of walleye (Sander vitreus) in northern Alberta and application to species management Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
population structure
microsatellites
forensic
walleye
genetic
management
stocking
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Burke, Lindsey Alison
Supervisor and department
David W. Coltman (Biological Sciences)
Richard M. Jobin (Adjunct)
Examining committee member and department
Michael G. Sullivan (Adjunct)
A. Lee Foote (Renewable Resources)
William M. Tonn (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-12T21:43:19Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically valuable freshwater fish throughout North America. In Alberta, pressure from sport fishing and commercial fishing make effective management and protection of this species crucial to its sustainability. Walleye from 12 Alberta lakes were genetically characterized using 15 microsatellite markers. Each lake contained a genetically distinct walleye subpopulation within a larger population of the river basin in which the lake was situated. Differentiation between subpopulations varied (θST=0.05 to 0.29). Patterns of genetic divergence aligned closely with the current hydro-geographical landscape, except where stocking events have occurred. Vicariance and natal philopatry are likely mechanisms maintaining the current genetic structure. The markers detected sufficient genetic variation between most subpopulations to assign an individual fish to a subpopulation of origin. The utility of genetic assignment was illustrated for stocking assessment and forensic enforcement. These genetic data will help to inform management decisions, monitor population status and enforce harvest restrictions for Alberta walleye.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1066252
Last modified: 2015:10:12 19:43:08-06:00
Filename: Burke_Lindsey_Fall2010.pdf
Original checksum: 7b033943a1bd184a973b3b6b28d0d9c2
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Malformed dictionary: Vector must contain an even number of objects, but has 19 offset=546724
File title: Introduction
File author: Lindsey Burke
Page count: 108
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