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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VC8F

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Serials: The contested and contextual meanings of seriality. Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
murder
monogamy
seriality
Hacking
arson
classification
genealogy
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Larocque, Rachelle MJ
Supervisor and department
Haggerty, Kevin (Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Hogeveen, Bryan (Sociology)
Aitken, Rob (Political Science)
Department
Department of Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-08-27T19:37:55Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Systems of classifications are socially created and historically contingent. New classifications lead to the creation of new categories, new objects and new kinds of people. Over the last thirty years, some of the most successful categories have emerged from the study of seriality. This thesis examines the emergence of three categories of seriality, including serial murder, serial monogamy and serial arson through a genealogical analysis. This thesis argues that seriality is a complex category that involves a host of important attributes, traits, characteristics, social, legal and medical categories, institutions, expertise and knowledge. Combined, these factors shape our understandings and highlight the complexity of seriality by considering important aspects that are too often taken for granted. The focus on three diverse groups of seriality highlights the interdisciplinary nature of seriality and its growing dominance among both public and private discourse.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VC8F
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File author: Rachelle
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