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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3030W

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Hydrogen production from biomass Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Pyrolysis
Gasification
Biohydrogen
Straw
Production cost
Whole forest
Carbon credits
Techno-economic assessment
Forest residue
Greenhouse gas emission
Optimal plant size
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sarkar, Susanjib
Supervisor and department
Kumar, Amit (Mechanical Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Kumar, Amit (Mechanical Engineering)
Bressler, David (Agricultural, Food, & Nutritional Science)
Lipsett, Michael (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-05-05T21:21:48Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Hydrogen can be produced from biomass; this hydrogen is called biohydrogen. Biohydrogen produced in Western Canada can partially contribute to meeting the demand for hydrogen needed for bitumen upgrading. Gasification and pyrolysis are two promising pathways for producing biohydrogen in a large-scale plant. Syngas, produced from the gasification of biomass, and bio-oil, produced from fast pyrolysis of biomass, can be steam reformed to produce biohydrogen. The cost of biohydrogen delivered by pipeline to a distance of 500 km is $2.20 per kg of H2, assuming that a plant utilizes 2000 dry tonnes of whole-tree biomass per day processing it in a Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) gasifier. For forest residue- and straw-based biohydrogen plants the values are similar: $2.19 and $2.31 per kg of H2, respectively. Maximum economy of scale benefits are realized for biohydrogen production plants capable of processing 2000 and 3000 dry tonnes per day using BCL and GTI (Gas Technology Institute) gasification technology, respectively. The cost of biohydrogen from fast pyrolysis ($2.47 per kg of H2 from a 2000 dry tonne per day plant), using forest residue as the feedstock, is higher than the cost of biohydrogen produced by gasification. Carbon credits of about $120-$140 per tonne of CO2 are required to make biohydrogen competitive with natural-gas-based hydrogen.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3030W
Rights
License granted by Susanjib Sarkar (sarkar@ualberta.ca) on 2009-05-05T15:47:13Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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